Archive for November, 2011

JustiaGate: “The Great American Memory Hole” by Cindy Simpson at American Thinker

Posted in Uncategorized on November 9, 2011 by naturalborncitizen

The America Thinker blog published a vital report by Cindy Simpson yesterday, entitled “The Great American Memory Hole”.  It’s a comprehensive analysis of information which is disappearing via Orwellian subterfuge.  And she’s all over JustiaGate as well as the subversion of testimony by Bankruptcy Judge Gonzalez in the Chrysler dealers’ litigation brought by myself and Steve Pidgeon.

I am very impressed that this influential blog has seen fit to make JustiaGate related reports the top story of the day on more than one occasion.  There is much more to come on JustiaGate in the weeks ahead, and not just from the same blogs covering the story now.  Nuff said.

Cindy Simpson has also requested a full interview with me concerning the pending $128,000 spank put on Steve and I by the 2d Circuit, Court of Appeals for having the audacity to even petition the court to review the true record of the case, in spite of the Southern District of New York having ordered oral argument (sua sponte) twice and having issued a seven page opinion which never suggested the cause of action was frivolous.  The 2d Circuit’s attempt to silence Steve and I, and to curtail our ability to represent clients by virtue of this draconian intimidation is literally unprecedented in the entire history of American Jurisprudence.   I have granted Cindy’s request for the interview.

Stay tuned…

Leo Donofrio, Esq.

JustiaGate: Keep Scrubbing, Stanley…You Missed a Few Spots.

Posted in Uncategorized on November 2, 2011 by naturalborncitizen

[UPDATED: Nov. 18, 2011 9:28 A.M. See new RULES for posting comments.]

[UPDATED: Nov. 6, 2011 11:53 AMSee New RULES on posting comments.]

Justia.com published corrupted versions of 25 US Supreme Court opinions pertaining to the issue of POTUS eligibility.  (See previous JustiaGate reports here, here, here and here.)  Admitting that many Supreme Court cases had, in fact, been “mangled”, Justia CEO Tim Stanley told CNET on Oct. 24, 2011:

“When we discovered the issue, we corrected the script and the cases now render correctly.”

But it’s now apparent that Justia missed a few rather large spots cleaning up their mess.  This morning, I received a comment by prolific Constitutional researcher, Dan Goodman, who published an article entitled, “Natural (native) Born Citizen Defined“, on Aug. 22, 2009 at the Social Science Research Network.  (This post does not intend to comment upon the conclusions of Goodman’s article.)  In that report, Goodman quotes directly from the United States Supreme Court in BLAKE v. MCCLUNG, 172 U.S. 239, 256-257 (1898):

“The constitution forbids only such legislation affecting citizens of the respective states as will substantially or practically put a citizen of one state in a condition of alienage when he is within or when he removes to another state, or when asserting in another state the rights that commonly appertain to those who are part of the political community known as the People of the United States, by and  for whom the government of the Union was ordained and established.” (Emphasis added.  Link to FindLaw version of case.)

Mr. Goodman’s comment (cross posted at The Real Revo) states that since his article was published, Justia sabotaged the quote:

“After I placed this article online, the case of Blake v. McClung, was altered on the Justia.com website. Before, it read as it does in the bounded volumes of the United States Reports (of the Supreme Court of the United States)…

The words “PEOPLE OF” have been removed.

I am of the opinion that this was done intentionally. A primary source such as Justia should be considered a reliable service in providing accurate documentation relating to the opinions issued by the Supreme Court of the United States. Its representations of the opinions of the Supreme Court of the United States should be the same as the opinions appear in the standard; that is, the bounded volumes…”

The current version at Justia does, in fact, strip the words “People of” from the Court’s opinion.  Here is the text as currently published at Justia (which has been documented by myself, Mr. Goodman and Cindy Simpson of American Thinker):

“The Constitution forbids only such legislation affecting citizens of the respective states as will substantially or practically put a citizen of one state in a condition of alienage when he is within or when he removes to another state, or when asserting in another state the rights that commonly appertain to those who are part of the political community known as the the United States, by and for whom the government of the Union was ordained and established.”  (Emphasis added.)

Here is a screenshot of the current Justia page.

This is a particularly egregious example of legal sabotage in that it removes actual text from the opinion, not just a citation.  This is a textbook example illustrating how drastically a legal precedent can be altered by the simple removal of two words.  Such removal corrupts the official Supreme Court opinion by changing the meaning of this most important quote which highlights the superiority of the People over the government.  The text removed exhibits a furious contempt for we the People held by whoever is pulling Tim Stanley’s puppet strings. 

The Supreme Court in Blake v. McClung clearly states that the government was “ordained and established” for ” the People of the United States”.  But the Justia sabotage makes it appear as if the Supreme Court is declaring that the political community is the government itself and not the People.  Notice that “People” is capitalized by the US Supreme Court, while “government” is not.  No wonder this particular passage was “mangled”… and remains so as of this morning.

The power is in the People, not the government.  The government was created to serve the People, not the other way around which is what Justia is peddling with this false quote.

Dan Goodman states that the case was originally published by Justia to include the full text.  And Goodman testifies that the sabotage took place after he published his paper. I do not have access to prior versions of Blake v. McClung published by Justia since they’ve scrubbed the prior versions from the web.  Perhaps Dan Goodman saved them.  I have written to him in this regard.

While claiming that an innocent coding error was behind the mangled cases, Justia simultaneously removed all access to prior snapshots of previous Justia versions of Supreme Court cases at the Wayback Machine.

Justia must be pressured to unblock access to the Wayback Machine for every Supreme Court case published by Justia.  Researchers needs to know if the versions of cases they previously relied on at Justia were genuine or if they were infected with false data reeking of subversive propaganda.  It’s time the US Supreme Court spoke up.  It’s time the US Supreme Court heard from we the People as well.

We can see right now that Justia missed this bit of scrubbing as of this morning.  So Tim Stanley’s statement to CNET’s Declan McCullagh was not true.  We shall see whether McCullagh follows up to correct the record.

But the “errors” don’t stop there.  More scrubbing is necessary, Tim.  Happy hunting.

Leo Donofrio, Esq.